New York Governor Cuomo’s draft 2014 State Energy Plan

The drafted State Energy Plan is intended to benefit  all New Yorkers. The initiatives stated in the plan include the “focus on improving energy affordability, promoting private sector engagement and financing, and working to bolster our electric grid”.

 in The Grid Optimization Blog explores a number of intiatives within the plan that are based on what he believes is misinformation and not so cut and dry.

 Some examples of Mr. Cordaro points are:

  • The “demand for electricity will ultimately increase”, thus energy efficiency measures can’t offset the increase and NY State will still need to invest in generating resources
  • The amount of in-state sources of power must increase in order to achieve more affordable power in New York in the future
  • Private sector energy financing cannot be successful if the government is “selectively” subsidizing projects

Read More.

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Peak-to-average electricity demand ratio rising

According to US EIA, “the highest peak-hour electric demand for the year in 1993 was 52% above the hourly average level while in 2012 peak-hour demand had risen to 78% above the hourly average level.”

So what does this mean and what are the implications? Well US EIA says:

  • “generators called on to meet peak-hour demand are running fewer hours and/or at lower output levels the rest of the year”
  • “likely cutting into generator revenues and increasing the importance of capacity market payments to generators”

US EIA demonstrates to the reader the changes in hourly demand between 1993 and 2012 using a load duration curve.  Some possible reasons for the change that are discussed in the article are:

  • Lifting peak demand levels in the summer relative to average levels for the year
  • Energy efficient electrical equipment and appliances that reduce average electric demand
  • Shifts to a more service-based economy

 

Check out the Load Duration Curve and Video.

ASHRAE Announces Technology Award Recipients

“The ASHRAE Technology Awards recognize outstanding achievements by members who have successfully applied innovative building design.  Their designs incorporate ASHRAE standards for effective energy management and indoor air quality. The awards communicate innovative systems design to other ASHRAE members and highlight technological achievements of ASHRAE to others around the world. Winning projects are selected from entries earning regional awards.

First place awards will be presented at the ASHRAE 2014 Winter Conference in New York, N.Y., Jan. 18-22, New York Hilton.”–Jodi Scott

NY State Investment of $225 Million to turn Buffalo into the Silicon Valley for Clean Energy Research, Development and Manufacturing

“The massive investment, which accounts for nearly a quarter of the funds pledged through the Buffalo Billion initiative, is part of an all-in effort by Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo that, within the next 18 months, would build a pair of state-owned high-tech facilities, bigger than a Walmart store, packed with the type of state-of-the-art equipment and machinery that clean energy firms covet but can’t afford on their own.”

 

http://www.buffalonews.com/city-region/buffalos-future-looks-very-green-with-states-investment-in-high-tech-facilities-20131121

LEDs made the list of technologies for smart cities of the future

“Several cities, including Los Angeles, Seattle and Boston, already have committed to phasing out the traditional high-pressure sodium lights used in streetlights to LEDs. Bloomberg’s office expects New York to be the largest conversion project in the U.S., marking a significant milestone for the adoption of LED lighting technology. The project, which began with pilot tests in 2009, is set for completion in 2017.”–Martin LaMonica

 

Results from NYSERDA’s Multifamily Performance Programs: Getting 20% Reduction in Multifamily Buildings

“This preliminary analysis of the first 17 project to complete the Multifamily Performance Program is a small snapshot of the data that will eventually be generated by the program, but it illuminates some key trends – the uniform over-prediction of energy savings of mid-high rise buildings in the New York City area, the consistently strong performance of low-rise buildings located upstate, and the overall trend across building types and locations of over-prediction of electric savings. The over-prediction of electric savings is significant and warrants further inquiry, especially in light of the results of NYSERDA’s previous multifamily program, AMP, which also observed significant over-prediction of electric savings.”–ACEEE report from 2010