CAN NYC REDUCE ITS CARBON FOOTPRINT 90% BY 2050?

In an article by urban green council,

“The building sector is the source of 75 percent of New York City’s greenhouse gas emissions. 90 by 50’s modeling of eight typical building types shows that heating and cooling loads can be reduced through retrofit measures to a point where all thermal loads can be met by heat pumps, eliminating building fuel use. The resulting electric energy used in 2050, supplied by carbon-free sources, will be slightly more than today’s, while peak demand will increase significantly. “

How will we meet this goal when there are a number of behavioral, institutional and infrustructural issues?

Let’s name a few…..

  1. The NYC subway still has outdated lighting with T12 with magnetic ballasts
  2. A large # of residential buildings the tenants leave their window a/c units installed year round which results in heat loss
  3. Alternate side parking- numerous places throughout the city people sit and idle their cars while they wait for the street cleaner to pass
  4. Will NYC buses and Ferries run on alternative fuel? Who will pay for that?
  5. How long has it taken for the 2nd ave line and the #7 extension to be completed and yet still not done
  6. The city is strewn with tall Orange cones signifying high pressure steam leaks, down near bowling green there has been a cone sitting there forever (see my post from 5 months ago)
  7. A number of dept stores air condition the sidewalk and are not penalized
  8. Why don’t we harness the waste heat from the subway system, granted it is low quality heat but could be used to preheat DHW etc
  9. The financial system needs to be upgraded and standards for green capital needs assessments emphasized by HPD.
  10. At the end of a steam boiler’s life there should be greater incentive for retrofit to a hydronic heating system
  11. What is the carbon footprint of Times Square?
  12. Have you been downtown lately and seen the gridlock at the Holland Tunnel?
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Change coming to NYC subway?

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I was waiting for an uptown 4 or 5 train at the bowling green subway station and noticed LED lamps installed in a
few fixtures at the end of the platform.  Is this just a test? Could a massive retrofit of the T12 lamps throughout the NYC subway system be on the horizon?

“Energy Efficiency and Technologies in America’s Cities”- USMayors.org

“Whether it is deploying LEDs and other state-of-the-art lighting technologies, retrofitting public and private buildings or installing new solar energy systems, these priority activities are examples of how mayoral leadership is changing energy use in our cities. And, the findings in this survey also demonstrate how mayors and cities are adapting to changing conditions and partnerships, while still leading the nation on its energy and climate challenges.”– Tom Cochran

Summary of survey results:

  • 29% of cities choose LED/energy-efficient lighting  as the energy technology receiving top priority in their cities within the next two years.  Solar systems and building retrofits are second at 19%.
  • In 45% of surveyed cities- the City operating budget &

    City capital improvement program are “

    How Cities Expect to Finance Their Top Priority Technology”

  • 71% of the cities say that the utilities are the “most important partners in deploying new energy technologies”
  • 84% of cities say budget/funding constraints pose the “Most Significant Challenges in Advancing Energy Efficiency and Conservation”
  • 36% of cities have developed a “Comprehensive Energy Plan”
  • 40-50% of cities creating programs for residents and business for “Engaging the Local Community on Climate Activities”

http://usmayors.org/pressreleases/uploads/2014/0122-report-energyefficiency.pdf

BlocPower, a social enterprise that aims to provide job training and energy-efficient products in underserved neighborhoods

Baird, 31, runs BlocPower, a social enterprise that aims to provide job training and energy-efficient products in underserved neighborhoods.

“One in three men in that neighborhood was incarcerated, and so many of them who had served their time in jail had come back to the neighborhood and had nothing to do,” Baird said. “No one would hire them; they were not given a second chance. It was not clear what they were supposed to do with the rest of their lives.”

“Using about $2.5 million from the city’s federal stimulus funds, the group weatherized 400 houses, while training 20 formerly unemployed workers to do the work. He said the trainees received health benefits and were paid a wage high enough to sustain a family of four.”–WILLIAM HARLESS

New green programs are helping to guide small-business owners across NYC

“Small-business requests for green audits and retrofit overhauls tend to spike after natural disasters, a pattern repeated in the wake of superstorm Sandy last fall, said Don Giampietro, assistant commissioner at the city’s Department of Small Business Services. But in normal times, small-business owners often need an extra push.

New York City is also attempting to help businesses navigate the red tape involved in applying for green tax incentives and abatement plans, including discounts for natural gas or subsidies for solar panels.”–Richard Morgan 

 

5 ‘deep’ questions to unlock efficiency in buildings

5 ‘deep’ questions to unlock efficiency in buildings

“The results (downloadable at the Cameron-Cole website) confirm that many corporate sustainability executives believe comprehensive energy-efficiency retrofits of existing buildings represent the most effective way to reduce emissions and reduce operating costs. Despite this apparent consensus, a significant gap exists between the perceived economic and environmental effectiveness of comprehensive energy efficiency retrofits and their implementation.”